Basic Income Documentary

Mincome

 
 
a documentary short with the audacious goal of orchestrating the launch of a Universal Basic Income here in the United States
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Mincome documentary shorT

We are creating a short documentary to reveal the stories that capture the personal findings of Mincome. Through the art of cinema we are crafting a compelling and emotional film by focusing on the residents of Dauphin to show how Mincome impacted their life. The film will help audiences understand how the pilot was deployed and impact that it had on the residents who received it. The goal of the project is to show the positive impact to leaders considering the implementation of a Basic Income in the US. Our hope is that the success in Dauphin spurs the adoption in the US.

 

about Mincome

Mincome was a pilot in Dauphin, a Manitoba, Canada from 1974 to 1979. During this pilot a Basic Income was available to the residents who needed it most. It was a saturation site where any resident could apply; ultimately over 2,000 people received a guaranteed income in Dauphin.

The pilot was deployed as a negative income tax meaning ultimately only people beneath a certain income would receive cash.

 
 
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Cast of Characters

We are currently in pre-production and plan to visit Dauphin, Winnipeg and Toronto in fall of 2017. If you are a resident of Dauphin, participated in the pilot project from 1974-1979 and are interested in sharing your story, we would love to hear from you.

PILOT PARTICIPANTS FROM DAUPHIN

SUSIE SECORD Susie said Mincome had a profound effect on her life. Basic Income enabled her to support her family and get the educated she needed to pursue a career. She's gone on to become the president of the Friends of Dauphin, a social services organization that specializes in programs for disadvantaged communities in Dauphin.

SUSIE SECORD

Susie said Mincome had a profound effect on her life. Basic Income enabled her to support her family and get the educated she needed to pursue a career. She's gone on to become the president of the Friends of Dauphin, a social services organization that specializes in programs for disadvantaged communities in Dauphin.

ERIC RICHARDSON Eric was 14 - 19 during Mincome. He learned that his parents received it when his mom begin speaking about it later in life. He says that the extra bit of cash gave his family options. He had his first dental visit with funds they received from Mincome, because dentist wasn’t covered under regular health care. He had 10 cavities & got them drilled without anethesia. Most notable, Eric was able to stay in school instead of having to join the workforce early.

ERIC RICHARDSON

Eric was 14 - 19 during Mincome. He learned that his parents received it when his mom begin speaking about it later in life. He says that the extra bit of cash gave his family options. He had his first dental visit with funds they received from Mincome, because dentist wasn’t covered under regular health care. He had 10 cavities & got them drilled without anethesia. Most notable, Eric was able to stay in school instead of having to join the workforce early.

BETTY WALLACE Betty and her family were participants in Mincome. Betty remembers that her family was able to save the money to purchase a truck that enabled their family to more effectively run their family farm.

BETTY WALLACE

Betty and her family were participants in Mincome. Betty remembers that her family was able to save the money to purchase a truck that enabled their family to more effectively run their family farm.

 

PILOT LEADERS & RESEARCHERS

RON HIKEL Ron was executive director of Mincome Manitoba, the federal-provincial basic income experiment in Dauphin for the entire duration of the program from 1974 to 1979. He served as assistant deputy minister for income security in Manitoba.  His work in three nations (Canada, Britain and the United States) has been focused on advancing and applying the public sector’s capacity to serve the public good. Examples include teaching political science in two Canadian and one US universities His main research interest is in improving public sector performance; and developing causal models of public sector service delivery failure. Recently he presented a paper to the International Political Science Association on that topic; and on which he is writing a book. He is a member of the editorial board of The Innovation Journal.  Ron Hikel is a Boston and Columbia University educated political scientist. He has applied this discipline in four fields: academia, public service, private sector management consulting and as campaign organizer and political advisor. Ron Hikel is a veteran of active service with the US Air Force, is married and has three adult children. He is a dual citizen of both the US and Canada, where he has lived for almost 50 years.

RON HIKEL

Ron was executive director of Mincome Manitoba, the federal-provincial basic income experiment in Dauphin for the entire duration of the program from 1974 to 1979. He served as assistant deputy minister for income security in Manitoba. 

His work in three nations (Canada, Britain and the United States) has been focused on advancing and applying the public sector’s capacity to serve the public good. Examples include teaching political science in two Canadian and one US universities His main research interest is in improving public sector
performance; and developing causal models of public sector service delivery failure. Recently he presented a paper to the International Political Science Association on that topic; and on which he is writing a book. He is a member of the editorial board of The Innovation Journal.

 Ron Hikel is a Boston and Columbia University educated political scientist. He has applied this discipline in four fields: academia, public service, private sector management consulting and as campaign organizer and political advisor. Ron Hikel is a veteran of active service with the US Air Force, is married and has three adult children. He is a dual citizen of both the US and Canada, where he has lived for almost 50 years.

EVELYN FORGET In 2011 University of Manitoba economist who analyzed all of the records and data from the pilot. She discerned differences in social, economic and health outcomes for Dauphin residents. She found that only new mothers and teenagers worked substantially less. Mothers with newborns stopped working because they wanted to stay at home longer with their babies, and teenagers worked less because they weren't under as much pressure to support their families, which resulted in more teenagers graduating. In addition, those who continued to work were given more opportunities to choose what type of work they did. Forget found that in the period that Mincome was administered, hospital visits dropped 8.5 percent, with fewer incidents of work-related injuries, and fewer emergency room visits from accidents and injuries. Additionally, the period saw a reduction in rates of psychiatric hospitalization, and in the number of mental illness-related consultations with health professionals. *"The Town With No Poverty." Evelyn Forget. 2011

EVELYN FORGET

In 2011 University of Manitoba economist who analyzed all of the records and data from the pilot. She discerned differences in social, economic and health outcomes for Dauphin residents. She found that only new mothers and teenagers worked substantially less. Mothers with newborns stopped working because they wanted to stay at home longer with their babies, and teenagers worked less because they weren't under as much pressure to support their families, which resulted in more teenagers graduating. In addition, those who continued to work were given more opportunities to choose what type of work they did. Forget found that in the period that Mincome was administered, hospital visits dropped 8.5 percent, with fewer incidents of work-related injuries, and fewer emergency room visits from accidents and injuries. Additionally, the period saw a reduction in rates of psychiatric hospitalization, and in the number of mental illness-related consultations with health professionals.

*"The Town With No Poverty." Evelyn Forget. 2011

DAVID CALNITSKY David Calnitsky published an analysis of a community survey of Dauphin completed in 1976 that probed for motivations for participation and perceptions of stigma associated with a GAI. He finds that an important benefit of basic annual incomes is the reduced stigma compared to conventional welfare *"More Normal than Welfare": The Mincome Experiment, Stigma, and Community Experience. Canadian Journal of Sociology, Vol. 53, No. 1 (2016) *"Basic Income In a Small Town: Understanding the Elusive Effects On Work."

DAVID CALNITSKY

David Calnitsky published an analysis of a community survey of Dauphin completed in 1976 that probed for motivations for participation and perceptions of stigma associated with a GAI. He finds that an important benefit of basic annual incomes is the reduced stigma compared to conventional welfare

*"More Normal than Welfare": The Mincome Experiment, Stigma, and Community Experience. Canadian Journal of Sociology, Vol. 53, No. 1 (2016)

*"Basic Income In a Small Town: Understanding the Elusive Effects On Work."

 
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